The Economics of Olympic games

A comprehensive research conducted by Goldman Sachs titled “The Olympics and Economics 2012” precisely attempts to answer this question. The researchers analyzed the Olympic Games which were conducted in Beijing and Sydney, few years ago, and thus made a few projections for London 2012. What is of significant interest is that a lot of these projections are destined to come true and revitalize the economies, which are somewhat in a sombre mood in early 2012. Even the Prime Minister of United Kingdom, David Cameron, thinks that the Olympics will roll in 13 Billion pounds for the nation (even though that may help little to douse the fire burning within the economy).

The British economy really needs a boost, thanks to a protracted double-dip recession that has pushed down GDP for three quarters without even an inkling of a  break. The Olympic Games hosted in London 2012 (underway currently) have been projected to be extremely profitable for the “British Empire”,  and the revenues have been forecasted to exceed the operating cost of hosting the major event. Tickets sales are expected to generate over 500 million pounds or 785 million dollars and generate direct revenue for the management. This itself is a huge amount for a nation trapped in a continent facing rampant economic slowdown at large.In addition, a short-term financial boost in the third quarter of 1.2–1.6 percent of GDP at an annualized rate has been forecasted. This will also generate a lot of employment to a nation strapped with excess workable hands with very little to do. In addition, the tourism industry will get a healthy dosage of fuel to the slumbering embers, and this may just be sufficient to the industry slowly lumbering to a dormant stage.

With such a concern over economic health revision, a public-private partnership to ensure the success of such grand fiestas could be a shot for success. While such boost is sure to affect many sections of the society both directly and indirectly, the long term boon of employing workers for digging a trench and employing another set of workers to fill it up, are also evident in this case, though the analogy may be less fitting. Considering Ireland, which is in dire straits, will the benefits of the Olympic games overflow to Britain’s closest neighbor?

What is more important at this stage that will Brazil also benefit in the same big way, in 2016? With so much focus on her economy, will the benefits boost Brazil’s stake in the cake as an economic superpower? Only time can tell more how this story unfolds itself.

Author: Kar

Dr. Kar works in the interface of digital transformation and data science for business management domains. Professionally a professor (IIT, IIM) and an alumni of XLRI, he has extensive experience in teaching, training, consultancy and research in reputed institutes. He is a Regular Contributor of Business Fundas and a blogging addict. Note: The articles authored in this blog are his personal views and does not reflect that of his affiliations.