Google may be looking to incorporate touch features in their Chrome operating system. This would pitch Chrome’s capabilities against that of Apple’s I-Pad touch features (or even against HP Slate). Who would win this battle of the giants?

When questioned about whether Chrome OS would include multitouch capability, Anders Sandholm, Senior Product Manager of Search, quoted “I can’t, I mean, right now we are targeting netbooks, that’s what we’re focused on, but I expect it to work well. We expect it to target everything up to desktop computers. Chrome OS will be built for a specific hardware setup.”

Incorporating the Touch Feature would enable Google to enter the tablet markets, one, which Google is still to enter. This would pit Google severely against Apple’s newly launched I-Pad and against the zillion other tablet devices by Hewlett Packard, Lenovo, Dell and Acer (to name a few).

Mobile devices from HTC, Apple, Nokia, Motorola, Samsung, LG, HP and others have already made touch capablities popular amongst the the consumers. With so many mobile devices providing support for touch features, consumers are ready to accept an operating system which would imbibe that magic touch experience into the operating systems of laptops, notepads and desktops.

The market is already there, awaiting to be tapped.

Would Google be the first entrant and sweep over the consumers all over the world with this new operating system? What do you think should be Microsoft’s strategy in light of this statement by Anders.

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The demand for faster calculations can’t be met by only relying on the speed increase resulting from advances in computer technology as high end super computers are that much costly. One of the solutions to this problem for ‘not-so-deep-pockets’ is the distribution of the numerical tasks to a set of machines. So how to provide supercomputer capabilities cheaply? The answer is Beowolf Clusters. This process is called parallelization because the computers complete their tasks in parallel instead of the traditional step‐by‐step (serial) execution. As computer codes have been updated to use this new paradigm, the demand for parallel computers has grown. In general, such computers need to have:

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Amidst a lot of hype as always, today 27th January, 2010, Apple launches the I-Pad. While it is being viewed as the product that will rejuvenate Apple’s revenues for years to come, a question many staunch Apple fans (and those who are not fans of course) will ask, is it really worth the hype? Apple has always created a market even when there is none. Will it be successful yet again this time?

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Today, with the rise of popularity of ubiquitous computing and enterprise mobility, more and more professionals have started using PDAs and smart-phones for conducting business. A major risk is that such usage exposes one to attacks through the less secure WiFi or Edge. The cipher used by the General System for Mobile Communications (GSM) has been cracked by a German researcher Karsten Nohl who presented his findings Sunday at a hacker conference in Berlin. So there is a reasonable cause for most users to worry as the security scheme used by 80 percent of the world’s cellular telephones has been compromised.

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E-business is a term used to describe businesses run on the Internet, or utilizing Internet technologies to improve the productivity or profitability of a business. In a more general sense, the term may be used to describe any form of electronic business – that is to say, any business which utilizes information technology. This usage is somewhat archaic, however, and in most contexts e-business refers exclusively to Internet enabled businesses.

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So WHAT is GOOGLE WAVE?
As Google says, Google Wave is an online tool for real-time communication and collaboration. A wave can be both a conversation
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Data security is a major concern in the banking industry where over the years technology has been used to implement various standards to facilitate the implementation of security in the various transactions and internal processes in the industry. Post 1996, banks started implementing data security in transactions using EDI or Electronic data Interchange standards. Financial EDI standards were developed to cater to the requirements of financial institutions like banks.

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